Farmer, Horseman

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9 thoughts on “Farmer, Horseman

  1. I am slowly getting used to the horses in the stable near us and they are getting used to us I think. At least one special horse always comes to greet us when he sees us, otherwise I think I am too old to get too close to an animal like a horse. Our Swiss system is probably to fixed to change it for views at other occupations. My son was in the gymnasium, he studied, took the Matura and went on to study law. It was just an automatic process.

    • That is one reason so many Swiss (and German) students came here to learn English and then attended university here. It was one way they could change their direction later on in their lives. I used to think the Swiss system was too fixed, but now I think that for most people, it’s probably a good system. It would be a lot better here than what we have. Most kids just need a good job. But I think that after a certain point in life, it’s impossible to start over. There’s no way I could change now — I’m not even physically able to be a farmer at this point. Horses are really nice animals. I had no idea, truly. I wish I could have one, but that’s impossible.

  2. I so enjoyed your story about Brownie! Because of a rather terrified experience when I was five years old, riding for the first time (on a mule, believe it or not, although it was advertised as horse rides), I became terrified of large, four-legged animals. Many girls go through a horse stage sometime before they hit puberty, but I never got there. I think they’re incredibly beautiful creatures, and I’ll watch them from afar, but I guess it’ll be another lifetime before I ride one! As you say, after a certain point, you can’t start over. Thanks for sharing.

    • No, it’s too late for me to become a horsewoman. I have been seriously injured from falls, notably off Irish leading to a bad concussion and a hole in my retina (since healed). Another friend’s horse backed into a ditch (I told her to without knowing it) and almost landed on me. I’ve been brushed off on fences and you name it, now I know because I had no idea how a horse thinks or what one might want from me. I had no respect for them or curiosity about them, either. My Brownie experience was a huge surprise. I’ve had two horse experiences since I moved to Colorado — one was magic and the other the same old thing. I could feel the horse constantly challenging me for power over what we were doing. I didn’t like that. It did not increase my interest in riding him at all, though I know he’s a good horse and likes people. In a one hour lesson, nothing profound was going to happen and it was physically difficult enough for me that dealing with the power struggle was just more than I cared to deal with.

  3. I loved reading this, Martha, as I just love horses! I was obsessed as a little girl, reading books about horses (Misty of Chincoteague, etc), creating scrapbooks, drawing, you name it. When I was 9, I got the thrill of my young life by getting my own horse when we lived in Portland for 2 years. I rode that horse all over Beaverton (much more rural in 1969) on a bareback pad, since I couldn’t put a saddle on. thanks for waking up that wonderful memory! I think you would have been great as a horse whisperer 🙂

    • Maybe — I’d like to think so. I know for sure I never expected that but I miss Brownie as much now as I did a year ago when he left just before his people moved to a ranch in NorCAL. I never read Misty of Chicoteague, but I had a friend who had and when we were at a conference in Maryland, we went out to Assateague Island to see the horses. We walked everywhere, didn’t see a single horse. When we turned around to go back to the car, there they were, something like 8 horses following us. I think they’d been there all along but you couldn’t hear them with the ocean waves and on the soft sand. Since that moment, I’ve thought horses have a sense of humor. 🙂 I wish I could have one.

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